Difference between revisions of "Wasei Kingu Kongu (lost silent Japanese short; 1933)"

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[[File:King_Kong_Japanese.jpg|frame|Still one of two.]]
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{{InfoboxLost
'''''Wasei Kingu Kongu''''' (aka ''Japanese King Kong'') was a 1933 silent Japanese short film Written by Akira Fushimi, directed by Torajira Saito and featuring Isamu Yamaguchi as the title character. Not much is known about the film, but it is believed to basically be the same story as the American original, which came out the same year, with the character of Kong running amok in Japan instead of the U.S.
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|title=<center>Wasei Kingu Kongu</center>
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|image=WaseiKinguKongu-Flyer1.jpg
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|imagecaption=1933 promotional flyer.
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|status=<span style="color:red;">'''Lost'''</span>
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}}
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'''''Wasei Kingu Kongu''''' (和製キングコング, aka ''Japanese King Kong'') is a 1933 silent Japanese short film directed by Torajira Saito, written by Akira Fushimi, and featuring Isamu Yamaguchi.
  
[[File:999566_3186740523303_1842035604_n.jpg|thumb|204px|Still two of two.]]
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The film is noteworthy for being one of the first Japanese monster movies. It is believed that there are no special effects in the film, as the plot involves a man trying to earn money to woo his girlfriend by playing the King Kong character on stage.<ref>October 21, 1933 issue of ''Kinema Junpo''</ref><ref>December 1934 issue of ''Kagaku no Nihon''. Pg.85</ref>
  
The film is noteworthy for possibly being the first Japanese monster movie ever made, (said title originally being thought to have been held by Toho's 1954 ''Gojira'' -aka ''Godzilla''-).  It was distributed by Shochiku, who also handled the Japanese distribution rights of the original, although this film was possibly made without RKO's permission. The film has been lost and unseen for many years and was believed to have been one of the many movies destroyed in the 1945 American atom bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. To this day, all that remains are two small still pictures.
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It was distributed by Shochiku, who also handled the Japanese distribution rights of the original, although this film may have been made without RKO's permission.
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The film has been lost and unseen for many years and was believed to have been one of the many movies destroyed in the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. All that has survived are two stills and several flyers.
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==Gallery==
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<gallery mode=packed heights=175px>
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WaseiKinguKongu-Still1.jpg
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WaseiKinguKongu-Still2.jpg
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WaseiKinguKongu-Flyer2.jpg|Another promotional flyer.
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</gallery>
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==See Also (Kaiju Media)==
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*[[Space Monster Wangmagwi (lost South Korean kaiju film; 1967)]]
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*[[Wolfman vs. Godzilla (partially found footage from unfinished fan film; 1981)]]
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*[[Gojira (lost deleted scene of Kaiju movie; 1954)]]
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*[[Gogola (lost Bollywood monster movie; 1966)]]
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*[[Godzilla vs. Megalon (lost NBC John Belushi skit bumpers for film; 1977)]]
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==See Also (King Kong Media)==
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*[[The King Kong Show (partially found animated series; 1966-1969)]]
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*[[King Kong (lost cut content of Pre-code monster adventure film; 1933)]]
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*[[The King Kong That Appeared in Edo (lost Japanese monster film; 1938)]]
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==References==
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{{reflist}}
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[[Category:Lost films]]
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[[Category:Completely lost media]]
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[[Category:Historic]]

Latest revision as of 04:10, 30 October 2021

WaseiKinguKongu-Flyer1.jpg

1933 promotional flyer.

Status: Lost

Wasei Kingu Kongu (和製キングコング, aka Japanese King Kong) is a 1933 silent Japanese short film directed by Torajira Saito, written by Akira Fushimi, and featuring Isamu Yamaguchi.

The film is noteworthy for being one of the first Japanese monster movies. It is believed that there are no special effects in the film, as the plot involves a man trying to earn money to woo his girlfriend by playing the King Kong character on stage.[1][2]

It was distributed by Shochiku, who also handled the Japanese distribution rights of the original, although this film may have been made without RKO's permission.

The film has been lost and unseen for many years and was believed to have been one of the many movies destroyed in the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. All that has survived are two stills and several flyers.

Gallery[edit | edit source]

See Also (Kaiju Media)[edit | edit source]

See Also (King Kong Media)[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. October 21, 1933 issue of Kinema Junpo
  2. December 1934 issue of Kagaku no Nihon. Pg.85