Difference between revisions of "One Hour Photo (partially lost rejected Trent Reznor score for thriller film; 2002)"

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{{InfoboxLost
 
{{InfoboxLost
|title=<center>One Hour Photo - Trent Reznor's Rejected Score (partially lost score)</center>
+
|title=<center>One Hour Photo (Trent Reznor's rejected score)</center>
 
|image=One_Hour_Photo_movie.jpg
 
|image=One_Hour_Photo_movie.jpg
 
|imagecaption=Poster for ''One Hour Photo''.
 
|imagecaption=Poster for ''One Hour Photo''.
 
|status=<span style="color:orange;">'''Partially Lost'''</span>
 
|status=<span style="color:orange;">'''Partially Lost'''</span>
 
}}
 
}}
 
 
''One Hour Photo'' is a psychological thriller film directed by Mark Romanek, released in 2002. The film stars Robin Williams as a photo technician who becomes obsessed with a family who's photos he works on.
 
''One Hour Photo'' is a psychological thriller film directed by Mark Romanek, released in 2002. The film stars Robin Williams as a photo technician who becomes obsessed with a family who's photos he works on.
  
While the final film was scored by Music by Reinhold Heil and Johnny Klimek, Romanek had originally approached Nine Inch Nails frontman and future Oscar-winning composer Trent Reznor to make music for the film after Romanek directed two music videos for NIN. However, Romanek later told that the producers were pressuring him to replace Reznor, who had only previously done minimal scoring contributions to David Lynch's Lost Highway and the score to id Software's video game Quake, with a "real composer". As a result the score, which was in the demo stage at the time, '''was scrapped entirely.'''<ref>[https://www.theguardian.com/music/2011/dec/21/trent-reznor-dragon-tattoo-soundtrack Article from 2011 briefly discussing Reznor's rejected score.] Retrieved 7 May '22</ref>
+
While the final film was scored by Music by Reinhold Heil and Johnny Klimek, Romanek had originally approached Nine Inch Nails frontman and future Oscar-winning composer Trent Reznor to make music for the film after Romanek directed two music videos for NIN. However, Romanek later told Reznor that the producers were pressuring him to replace Reznor, who had only previously done minimal scoring contributions to David Lynch's ''Lost Highway'' and the score to id Software's video game ''Quake'', with a "real composer". As a result the score, which was in the demo stage at the time, '''was scrapped entirely.'''<ref>[https://www.theguardian.com/music/2011/dec/21/trent-reznor-dragon-tattoo-soundtrack Article from 2011 briefly discussing Reznor's rejected score.] Retrieved 07 May '22</ref>
 
 
  
 
==Still (2002) and the Fate of the Score==
 
==Still (2002) and the Fate of the Score==
On January 22, 2002, Nine Inch Nails released the live concert CD/DVD ''And All That Could Have Been''. For the deluxe edition of the CD, it came with a second CD titled Still, a collection of softer and more acoustic reinterpretations of older NIN songs and a few never-before heard instrumentals. In 2004 on NIN's official website, Reznor revealed in an answer to a fan that the instrumental tracks from ''Still'' are an evolution to certain themes from his rejected ''One Hour Photo'' score, as despite the rejection he still liked the music itself.<ref>[https://www.nin.wiki/File:2004_05_07Questions1.gif Screenshot from the official NIN website, taken from NIN Wiki.] Retrieved 7 May '22</ref>
+
On January 22, 2002, Nine Inch Nails released the live concert CD/DVD ''And All That Could Have Been''. For the deluxe edition of the CD, it came with a second CD titled Still, a collection of softer and more acoustic reinterpretations of older NIN songs and a few never-before heard instrumentals. In 2004 on NIN's official website, Reznor revealed in an answer to a fan that the instrumental tracks from ''Still'' are an evolution to certain themes from his rejected ''One Hour Photo'' score, as despite the rejection he still liked the music itself.<ref>[https://www.nin.wiki/File:2004_05_07Questions1.gif Screenshot from the official NIN website, taken from NIN Wiki.] Retrieved 07 May '22</ref>
  
Reznor's score however has yet to be heard in its original form, and no demos have been released. It is also not known just how much the themes had changed from when Reznor began work on the score and when ''Still'' was recorded, and parts were dropped entirely without being reused.
+
Reznor's score however has yet to be heard in its original form, and no demos have been released. It is also not known just how much the themes had changed from when Reznor began work on the score and when ''Still'' was recorded, and if parts were dropped entirely without being reused.
  
 
==Gallery==
 
==Gallery==
 
<gallery mode=packed heights=175px>
 
<gallery mode=packed heights=175px>
2004_05_07Questions1.gif|Trent Reznor explaining how ''Still'' came to be on NIN.com
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600px-Still_cover.jpg|Cover for NIN's album ''Still''.
 +
2004_05_07Questions1.gif|Trent Reznor explaining how ''Still'' came to be on NIN.com.
 
</gallery>
 
</gallery>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
{{reflist|2}}
+
{{reflist}}
  
 
[[Category:Lost music]]
 
[[Category:Lost music]]
 
[[Category:Partially lost media]]
 
[[Category:Partially lost media]]

Latest revision as of 17:28, 20 May 2022

One Hour Photo movie.jpg

Poster for One Hour Photo.

Status: Partially Lost

One Hour Photo is a psychological thriller film directed by Mark Romanek, released in 2002. The film stars Robin Williams as a photo technician who becomes obsessed with a family who's photos he works on.

While the final film was scored by Music by Reinhold Heil and Johnny Klimek, Romanek had originally approached Nine Inch Nails frontman and future Oscar-winning composer Trent Reznor to make music for the film after Romanek directed two music videos for NIN. However, Romanek later told Reznor that the producers were pressuring him to replace Reznor, who had only previously done minimal scoring contributions to David Lynch's Lost Highway and the score to id Software's video game Quake, with a "real composer". As a result the score, which was in the demo stage at the time, was scrapped entirely.[1]

Still (2002) and the Fate of the Score[edit | edit source]

On January 22, 2002, Nine Inch Nails released the live concert CD/DVD And All That Could Have Been. For the deluxe edition of the CD, it came with a second CD titled Still, a collection of softer and more acoustic reinterpretations of older NIN songs and a few never-before heard instrumentals. In 2004 on NIN's official website, Reznor revealed in an answer to a fan that the instrumental tracks from Still are an evolution to certain themes from his rejected One Hour Photo score, as despite the rejection he still liked the music itself.[2]

Reznor's score however has yet to be heard in its original form, and no demos have been released. It is also not known just how much the themes had changed from when Reznor began work on the score and when Still was recorded, and if parts were dropped entirely without being reused.

Gallery[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]